Taiwan Indigenous Peoples Culture Park

North-South-East-West at Taiwan Indigenous Peoples Culture Park, Ping Dong 2005.

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The North-South-East-West Video Installation with Metis storyteller Graham Thompson was exhibited at the Taiwan Indigenous Peoples Culture Park in Ping Dong Taiwan in March 2005.

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The Indigenous Peoples in Taiwan

The indigenous peoples in Taiwan refer to the inhabitants who had been living on the islands before major Han Chinese immigration began in the 17th century. Culturally and linguistically, they belong to the Austronesian group. The Austronesian peoples, covering the most inclusive peoples in the world with the majority in Southeast Asia, originates from Taiwan in the north, extends to Easter Islands in South America in the east, and reaches Madagascar in the eastern coast of Africa in the west. The common characteristics to the Austronesian peoples are building houses on stilts to protect against damp, insects, and snakes; adopting slash-and-burn farming style; keen on chewing betel nuts, good at bamboo and rattan weaving; relying on hunting and fishing; and among others.

Taiwan is located in the very north point of the distribution of the Austronesian people and has been maintaining close contacts with the Austronesian peoples in the nearby South Pacific Islands for the last hundred thousand years. The various archaeological evidences suggest that Taiwan should be the origin of the distribution of the Austronesian peoples thousands years ago and should have played a critical geographical location as the origin of Ancient Austronesian peoples and in the process of migration to the South Pacific Islands.

The Origins of the Indigenous Peoples in Taiwan

It is currently said that there are two approaches to explain the origin of the Indigenous Peoples in Taiwan. One advocates that the origin of the indigenous peoples is located outside of Taiwan; the other one discerns that Taiwan is the ancient origin of the Austronesian peoples. The former theory is commonly popular and scholars testify in terms of languages, archaeology, literature review, folklore legends to conclude that the origin of the indigenous peoples should be the southeast coast of China. Scholars even predict the plausible era when the indigenous peoples migrated to Taiwan. For example, Saisiyat and Atayal must have immigrated to Taiwan around 3000 B.C. during the Paleolithic Age. Paiwan and Puyuma must have immigrated to Taiwan during the prime time of Southeast Asia Rock Age. The latter approach indicating that Taiwan is the origin of Austronesian peoples is a newer theory, a research result of many linguists.

Taipei National University of the Arts

North-South-East-West at Taipei Nat’l University of Arts, Taiwan 2005.

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The North-South-East-West Video Installation with Metis storyteller Graham Thompson was exhibited at the Taipei National University of the Arts in Taipei Taiwan in March 2005.

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The National Institute of the Arts

The National Institute of the Arts was founded in 1982 as an institute of higher learning for the arts. The institute was housed in Luzhou, Taipei County (now New Taipei City), from 1985 until its move in 1991 to its permanent campus in Kuandu, Taipei City. The buildings are designed in a neo-Chinese classical style and house state-of-the-art technology. The Institute was renamed Taipei National University of the Arts in 2001. Aside from the colleges and departments, the university houses the state-of-the-art Music Hall, the Performing Arts Center, including a theater hall and a dance recital hall, the Kuandu Museum of Fine Arts, a library, an Olympic-size swimming pool, the Center for the Study of Traditional Arts, a computer center, and the Center for the Study of Art and Technology.

Festivals organized by TNUA or using its campus include the Guandu Arts Festival and the Guandu Flower Festival (Guandu Flower Art Festival).

Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines

The North-South-East-West at the Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines, Taipei Taiwan in March 2005.

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The North-South-East-West Video Installation with Metis storyteller Graham Thompson was presented at the Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines, Taipei Taiwan in March 2005.

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The Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines

The Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines is a museum located just 200 metres diagonally across from the National Palace Museum in Shilin District, Taipei, Taiwan.

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It houses exhibits relating to the cultures and histories of the Taiwanese aborigines. The aboriginal tribes live mainly in the mountainous east and south of Taiwan and have historically spoken a variety of Austronesian languages, so it was thought important to have a central location in the capital where their cultures could be on display. Both permanent and rotating exhibits are a part of the museum. The museum is notable for its architectural design, featuring a 13.2 x 1.1 metres (43 x 3.6 feet) white granite totem pole at the entrance.

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The Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines was established in 1994 as a specialist museum founded on the collection and display of artefacts of Taiwan’s indigenous peoples. It is dedicated to promoting mutual understanding between different ethnic groups, through careful research, preservation and explanation of the essence of Aboriginal cultures. Achievement of these aims of mutual respect and appreciation will help to create a harmonious and gentle society.

The museum was originally based on the donation by its founder and chairman Safe C.F. Lin of his personal collection of Taiwanese Aboriginal artefacts acquired over many years in keeping with his desire to put something back into the community. By sharing his treasures with the whole of society he hoped to contribute to the ideal, “In loving our native place we must cherish each other’s cultures.”

Shung Ye Museum’s main displays introduce the natural environment of Taiwan’s indigenous peoples, their daily utensils, clothing and personal decoration, ritual objects and religious life. Films shown in the auditorium provide an understanding of the present conditions of Aboriginal life. The museum also has a special exhibition room where related exhibitions are held at regular intervals to broaden visitor’s field of concern, and to present the many faces of humankind’s culture.

Tamawan Village Gallery, Baguio Philippines

Medicine Wheel Video Installation exhibited in the Tamawan Village Gallery, Baguio Philippines, February 2005.

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The North-South-East-West Video Installation with Metis storyteller Graham Thompson was exhibited at the Tamawan Village Art Gallery, Baguio Philippines, February 2005.

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TAM-AWAN Village is a reconstructed Cordillera village showcasing the traditional Ifugao Huts, and Baguio’s art and culture scene. It was established by National Artist BenCab in 1998 together with Chanum Foundation to promote the local Baguio Artists. Tam-awan is a local word which means “vantage point” an apt name for a colony of Cordillera Huts that sit on a hillside that affords visitors a magnificent view of the South China Sea on a clear day. The Chanum Foundation, Inc., started reconstructing Ifugao houses in Baguio with the intention of recreating a native village accessible to those who have not had the opportunity to explore the different parts of the vast Cordillera region in the Philippines, laying the houses out just like a traditional Cordillera village. Tam-awan Village is also a venue for art exhibits, workshops and other activities that showcase the rich cultural heritage of the Cordillera people.

 

 

 

 

 

Ateneo de Manila University Art Gallery

North-South-East-West Installation exhibited at Taipei Ateneo de Manila University Art Gallery Philippines, 2005.

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The North-South-East-West Video Installation with Metis storyteller Graham Thompson was exhibited at the Ateneo de Manila University Art Gallery, Manila Philippines in February 2005.

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The Filipino tour included exhibitions and round table discussions at the following locations: Tamawan Village Art Gallery Baguio,  Ateneo Art Gallery Manila, – Darayonan Centre in Coron, Kamarikutan Gallery in Puerto Princessa, University of the Philippines Mindanao Cultural Centre Davao, Regional Education Learning Centre of Cotobato City, Round Table Discussions with Lumad groups in Cotabato City, and Western Mindanao State University in Zamboanga

Arko Ni Apo Gallery, Baguio Philippines

Tompalski’s Private Moments exhibited at the Arko Ni Apo Gallery, Baguio Philippines, 2005.

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Sherry Tompalski’s Private Moments Series was exhibited as digital images at the Arko Ni Apo Gallery, Baguio Philippines in February 2005.

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Private Moments, series of portraits, examines our desire to connect with others and the unknown connections made by others to us. The permanence of the painted images are like the timeless yearnings we have for others. Private Moments poses the questions “Is there such as thing as a private moment? Are all of our private moments filled with feelings about other people?”

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The Arko ni Apo Gallery

The Arko ni Apo art gallery, owned by Benhur Villanueva,  is only a few miles from the heart of Baguio City Philippines. Sculptor, painter and educator, Ben-Hur G. Villanueva, was an art teacher at the country’s prestigious university, Ateneo de Manila University.

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His celebrated monumental masterpieces are as follows: Kapit-Bisig – a commemorative Narra wood sculpture of four figures locking arms, which was presented by President Corazon Aquino to the Filipino people on the first year anniversary of the 1986 EDSA Revolution. Among Supremo – a sculpture of Andres Bonifacio at Global City Taguig City,  Thy Will Be Done – A sculpture at the campus of Saint Paul University Quezon City, St. Aloysius Gonzaga – A sculpture at the campus of Saint Louis University in Baguio city, and Risen Christ – A statue at Caleruega, Nasugbu, Batangas.  He has served as president for the Society of Philippine Sculptors (SPS), as Art director for the Ephpheta Foundation for the Blind, Inc., and as vice president-treasurer for Unesco’s International Art Association (IAA).

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Roberto Villanueva was Benhur Villanueva’s Brother

Roberto Villanueva was born in 1947 in Olongapo, Zambales, the Philippines. After graduating in 1973 with a Bachelor in Fine Arts from the University of Santo Tomas he taught at the Philippine Women’s University. He began his artistic career as a surrealist, but was gradually drawn into the film medium. In 1983 he became a member of the Board of Directors of the United Filmmakers Organization. He has won several awards in documentary film.

Pictured below is Roberto Villaneuva, The Philippines, performance in association with Ego’s Grave 1993 at the ‘1st Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art’, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 1993. © Estate of the artist; photograph: Andrea Higgins; image courtesy: Queensland Art Gallery ׀ Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA)

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When Roberto Villanueva moved to the northern highlands of Baguio in 1980 he was inspired to create art build from the basic materials of the environment. His art acquired a shamanic aura, the source of its powerful energy drawn from ancient but continuing community symbols, rituals and traditions among the animist ethnic groups.

Pictured below is Robert Villanueva, Ego’s grave 1993; installation and associated performance; carved earth figure in outdoor pit; glazed terracotta; installation view at the ‘1st Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art’, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, September 1993. © Estate of the artist; image courtesy: Queensland Art Gallery ׀ Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA)

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He won critical recognition for Archetypes: Cordillera Labyrinth set up on the Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP) grounds in the summer of 1989. Forty-five metres in diameter and 600 metres in length, the installation consisted of a spiral labyrinth made of bamboo and reeds. Its centre was covered with rocks from a river bed, creating a sacred space peopled with spirit figures from which life power emanates.

Another installation was Atang ti Kararua (Soul Offerings) consisting of three bamboo floats carrying offerings on a lake for the souls of those who perished in the big Baguio earthquake. The artists also conducted a ceremony with a shaman to pacify the spirit of Mount Pinatubo.

Roberto Villanueava tries to restore the communal function of art and the priminitve life force it originally possessed but which still survives in Cordillera mountain culture. He also seeks to recover and understand the animistic strain in the heart of Philippine culture.

In 1990 he was invited to New York as Artist-In-Residence of the New York State Council of the Arts and in 1992 won the CCP Thirteen Artists Award.

A recent work, Bridge Across Cultures, which the artist did in Saitama-ku, Japan, shows his preference for setting up water installations to symbolize migration routes linking different cultures. His work acquires an anthropological aspect, calling to mind the celebrated sea voyage of the Kon-Tiki across the Pacific.

With his use of organic materials and natural locations, together with community interaction, Roberto Villanueva creates an art that is integrated with the life of the people.

A reprinted from The First Asia-Pacific Triennial catalogue; written by Alice Guillermo. After the Triennial, Roberto Villanueva was diagnosed to have leukemia. He continued creating art until his death in February 1995.

 

 

 

 

Cotabato Philippines, Medicine Wheel

North-South-East-West at Regional Educational Learning Centre (RELC) of Cotabato City, February 2005.

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The North-South-East-West Video Installation with Metis storyteller Graham Thompson was presented February 22nd 2005 in Cotabato City Philippines at the Regional Education Learning Centre. The Installation was inspired by the Anishinaabe Medicine Wheel.

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The show accompanied by the Canadian Ambassador to the Philippines Peter Sutherland, was part of a 8 stop tour of the Philippines in February 2005, that included presentations at the Tamawan Village Art Gallery Baguio, Ateneo Art Gallery Manila, Darayonan Centre in Coron, Kamarikutan Gallery in Puerto Princessa, University of the Philippines Mindanao Cultural Centre Davao, Regional Education Learning Centre of Cotobato City, Lumad groups of Cotabato City  and the Western Mindanao State University in Zamboanga.

The installation traveled to Taiwan in March 2005 and was exhibited at the Pingdong Aboriginal Cultural Park, Taipei National University of the Art, Taiwan Public Television System, National Donghua University, Aboriginal Art Institute, and the ShunYi Taiwan Aboriginal Museum.

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The Cotabato presentation included an audience with the Teachers from the Regional Educational Learning Centre (RELC), the Canadian Embassador to the Philippines Peter Sutherland, Fatima-Ilon Adza, Al hadja Chief Administrative Officer of the Regional Educational Learning Centre.

Roundtable Discussions with Indigenous People of the Cotabato Region

Dr. Susan Y. Salivador-Anaytin – Chief Technical Management Services and Consultant for Peace of the Department of Trade and Industry of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao, organized the round table discussion group where Indigenous People from the Cotabato Region voiced concerns about their culture and societies.

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The Indigenous People Roundtable Dialogue at the Estosan Garden Hotel, Cotabato City of February 23, 2005 included the following list of participants: For Teduray Indigenous Peoples: Victoria Kanakan Executive Director – Office for Southern Cultural Communities (OSCC) – ARMM For Terudays and Manobos Indigenous Peoples: Ms Juanita Mamo and Rosita Bandala – Manobo IP and Kulaman Valley, South Cotabato, For Bangsamoro Group of Indigenous Peoples: Engr. Saad Yusah Director, Ms Sinaolan C. Mustapha and Hadja Bai Aleizzah Albaya-Balabaran Wampa of the Bureau of Cultural Heritage ARMM, For Manobos and other Indigenous Peoples in the Cotabato Area: Ms Felisa Rangaban and Ms. MAria Wanan for the NAtional Commission on IP, Region XII. For the Iranon Tribe: Mr Fispand Kamsa Commissioner, Mr. Mohammad Mang and Mr. Sol Kasim of the National Commissioner on Culture and Arts (NCCA).

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Dr. Susana Salvador-Anayatin has been a partner with the Goldin Institute since its launch in 2002 in Chicago. She holds a doctoral degree on Peace and Development and is a part time Peace Educator in two graduate schools in Mindanao in the Southern Philippines. Aside from her work in the government and the academe, Dr. Salvador-Anayatin leads the Goldin Institute’s initiatives in the Philippines to convene grassroots movements and develop partnerships with international and local NGO’s working for peace and development. She is actively involved in the promotion of a Culture of Peace and Nonviolence with women, youth, former combatants and other vulnerable sectors of the society. She currently leads the Goldin Institute’s efforts to build a National Platform for Child Soldier Reintegration and a People’s Peace Initiative in the Southern Philippines.